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September 9, 2022by melissa

We have been keeping a little secret at our farm. Last year we started our journey in apiculture! We had a harsh winter and lost our hives to the varroa mite. This spring, we started over with two different types of bees, hoping the genetic diversity would improve our overwintering numbers.

Each weekend we check our hives for freshly laid eggs, swarm cells ( baby queens cells) and general health. Not only is it exhilarating to work with the bees it also makes you slow down and become very deliberate with each action. It is brain training with sting therapy. 😉

Another first for us was using a flow hive! We love it. The honey it produced was so clear and delicious. The children loved getting involved, especially with the harvest. I think there was more honey on fingers than in jars! Next year we hope to expand our colonies little by little and maybe one day have enough honey to accompany our grains and flours.


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March 1, 2022by melissa

New Product Alert!

We are excited to share that we are now selling our very own Swedish Dishcloths!

These Swedish dishcloths replace approximately 17 rolls of paper towels and absorb up to 20x their weight.

Just like our packaging, these cloths are made from all natural materials so they are entirely compostable when you are done using them!

Add one to your next order! We hope you enjoy them! 


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February 1, 2022by melissa

As many of you may have seen in the news, there are food shortages in the grocery stores. There is no need to panic. Many experts, including University of Guelph Food chain supply Professor Michael Von Massow, believe our food system is resilient and we are not in imminent collapse! Consumer’s may not have the same selection available but we will have food on the grocery store shelves. One thing we are all seeing at checkout is the price increase due to supply shortages.

From our intro economics class, pricing is really determined by two confounding factors, supply, and demand. When supply decreases, prices often increase and quantity decreases.

Grain Supply

Here at 1847 Stone Milling, we have been very fortunate this year to work with great farmers to help us secure much of the raw grains we need to make the flour you love. We have also increased our raw grain storage with grain bins that help us to buy larger volumes and mitigate price fluctuations in the market.

Flour Demand

Demand continues to be strong for good quality flour and with the supply of raw material sorted we have been able to keep pricing stable

If you are looking for a quick read on our food system stability, take a look at this link from Professor Micheal Von Massow. There are also some great podcasts to listen to as well!


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December 10, 2021by melissa

Warmest Wishes this Holiday Season!

We wanted to thank you all for supporting us this year.
We are truly grateful for each and every one of you and are proud to provide fresh flour for you and your families.

We decided to do something special this holiday season.
For a limited time when you spend $50 (before shipping) we will add one of these metal bird ornaments to your order!

(1 ornament per order while supplies last)

Wishing you all a safe and happy holiday!


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November 12, 2021by melissa

Clementine Season is Here!

With every purchase of $40 or more before shipping, we will add a free clementine Swedish dishcloth to your order!
(1 dishcloth per order while supplies last – does not include gift card purchases)

These Swedish dishcloths replace approximately 17 rolls of paper towels and absorb up to 20x their weight.

Just like our packaging these cloths are made from all natural materials so they are entirely compostable when you are done using them!

Bonus: They look beautiful in your kitchen and can also make a great stocking stuffer! 😉

Shop now!


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October 4, 2021by melissa

During fall, we often cover up with warm sweaters and blankets to shelter from the elements. While our fields deserve to be cozy over the winter as well and so farmers are planting cover crops now that their primary crops have been harvested. Cover crops have been used for centuries in agriculture, but their benefit to topsoil health has only recently been studied in depth. All cover crops can aid in increasing the organic matter in the soil and are often referred to as “Green Manure”. Many times the cover crops grow over the fall and the following spring the crops are tilled under without being harvested. This increases organic content and soil fertility. Along with the benefit of soil health, the carbon that is drawn from the atmosphere is in the form of carbon dioxide which we know is a greenhouse gas contributing to global warming.

Different cover crops serve different purposes.  Cover crops of grasses are used when soil erosion is a concern. Typical grass cover crops include rye, oats, barley and wheat. The fast growing root system traps and holds soil in place preventing it from being eroded through wind or water typically caused by the spring thaw.

Legume cover crops such as clover and alfalfa capture nitrogen in the air and sequester it in the soil. This can offset chemical fertilizer in conventional farming and gives a boost to organic farmers where nitrogen is often a macro nutrient lacking in their fertilizer plan. The deep root structure of some legumes breaks up subsoil compaction which also helps crops like corn in subsequent years.

Non-legume broadleaf varieties include oilseeds and buckwheat varieties. These varieties work really well as a green manure and make many nutrients more bioavailable to the new crop being planted in the spring. While rare in Canadian farms due to climate, European farmers may even include flowering cover crops to support bees and migrating birds. That is an awfully nice bouquet of flowers as a gift to mother nature.

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September 15, 2021by melissa

Happy Organic Week! We thought this would be a great time to share some of our organic facts and stats with you!

  1. Did you know only NON-GMO grains can be certified organic!  All our grains and flours are Certified Organic through Ecocert Canada.
  2. No glyphosates (Round-up) can be used on a certified organic crop.
  3. It takes 3 years for a farm to become certified organic. During this time no chemical fertilizers/ pesticides or herbicides can be used.
  4. It takes one acre of land to produce 1,000kg’s of bread flour.
  5. It takes about 43 sqft of Ontario Farmland to make enough flour for 1 sourdough loaf of bread (1kg loaf).
  6. Certified Organic grains can cost up to 5x the price of conventional grains.
  7. At 1847 Stone Milling we believe that healthy complex soils make flavour rich good quality grains.

Grain

Type of flour

Hard Wheats

Bread Flour, Whole wheat flour

Soft Wheats

Cake and Pastry flour

Blends of hard and soft wheat

All- purpose flour

  1. Did you know wheat can be planted in the spring or the fall. Each variety of wheat specializes in specific traits/characteristic. Ex. Winter hardy, high protein, increased endosperm, drought resistant.     
  2. All our grains are proudly sourced in Ontario from small family farms and elevators. Supporting our local community!

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September 10, 2021by melissa

Bringing in the wheat!

As we mentioned in our last farm post, all the wheat is in! You may have heard in the news about wheat shortages in Western Canada due to poor growing conditions. Western Canada saw record-breaking droughts and many crops did not materialize throughout the growing season.

Ontario happened to have amazing growing conditions at the beginning of the summer. Lots of heat and rain! The conditions were so favourable the wheat became very plump ( lots of endosperm/ starch). The excess amount of endosperm made the proportion of protein much lower in the grain.   For example, hard red spring wheat typically has protein levels around 13% protein has fallen below 11%. When protein contents are low the grains cannot be used to make good quality bread flour. But you might ask yourself why does the protein not increase proportionally with the endosperm? Nitrogen in manure is the limiting reagent in the formation of protein in wheat. Farmers determine their nutrient loading rates ( amount of manure spread per acre) based on projected protein level and yield. Typically, the yields are fairly consistent year to year for crops. Farmers add enough nutrients to target the desired level based on the specific variety of grain and data from previous growing seasons. Adding too many nutrients can cause eutrophication of the water through runoff and frankly are a waste of valuable resources, which no farmer ever wants to do.  So most farmers are very particular about determining the appropriate nutrient load rates of the field based on the crop and average yield.   In short, most farmers did not spread enough nitrogen to compensate for unanticipated extra grain growth.

Fortunately here at 1847 we have been busy since the harvest sourcing a variety of high quality organic wheat from our local farmers around Ontario. We have already sourced both the rarer high protein level wheat for the bread flour and the more abundant moderate protein content wheat for the all-purpose flours and they are safely stored in our grain bins. This guarantees that the remainder of 2021 and well into 2022 you will have access to great flour that makes you proud to bake.